Porcupine

With sharp spines, a big, round nose, and a tail they can hang from, prehensile-tailed porcupines are nocturnal vegetarian rodents. They have short, thick spines, and their body color runs from yellowish to a orange-rust to brown to almost black. They weigh 4 to 11 pounds. Their bodies are 12 to 24 inches long, and their tails are almost as long as their bodies, adding another 10 to 20 inches. These porcupines use their prehensile tails for grasping and hanging.

Prehensile-tailed porcupines are not well studied in the wild because they stay high in trees, are slow moving , and are largely immobile during the day – all of which makes them difficult to stop.

At night, they move around – slowly – foraging for food in treetops. Despite their lack of speed, they are surprisingly agile and climb quickly when necessary.

They cannot jump or throw their quills (no porcupine can!), but their quills detach easily when touched and can even embed themselves into their enemy’s skin. These defense are so formidable that porcupines have a longer lifespan and a slower reproductive rate than many other rodents.

When excited, these porcupines stamp their hind feet and shake their backsides.

When they are born, Brazilian porcupines are covered with red hair and soft quills which harden over time. They live in tropical rainforest trees of Venezuela, Guiana, Brazil, Bolivia, Paraguay, Trinidad, and some extreme northern sections of Argentina, rarely descending to the forest floor.

They eat leaves, stems, flowers, shoots, roots and the cambium layer found beneath thee bark of some trees. Their life span in an animal care facility: over 10-12 years; in the wild: 10-12 years.

Did You Know?

What’s that smell? Porcupine musk.In order to mark territory, porcupines secrete a chemical called musk, which they rub onto branches and trees.

Bats eat twice their body weight each day – that’s as if a human were to eat 1,528 quarter-pound burgers each day!

Palla’s Long-Tongued Bat has the fastest metabolism of any mammal – on par with the metabolic rate of hummingbirds.


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