Porcupine Connection

Get an up-close look at one of our Prehensile Tail Porcupine, Alex or Prickles!

• Learn about our porcupines and how we care for them from the experts.
• All participants must be age 10 and over. Children age 12 and younger must be accompanied by a paid adult.
• Handheld camera permitted, but must be silent (no shutter sound), and no long lenses.
Please be aware that these animals are being fed nuts during this encounter. If you choose to do this encounter and have a nut allergy please call our reservations department and let them know.

When working with animals, they call the shots. Each encounter is unique and may contain different elements.

Day/Times
Wednesdays/ 11am
Session = 30 minutes (approx.)

Price
$40.00
(Aquarium Members: $36)*

 

 

>> Click to Download the Waiver<<

 

*Must be 10 years or older and reserved 24 hours in advance. All participants must complete waiver prior to adventure. Aquarium admission is not included and is required for the adventure!

Critter Cove

Barred Owls

The presence of owls in a forest is a good sign that the forest has matured and is able to provide a home for enough small animals to support large birds of prey. Barred owls inhabit forests of both deciduous and coniferous trees, spending their days roosting quietly in treetops and becoming active at dusk to hunt food. Barred Owls are nonmigratory and tend to stick around in the same patch of forest year-round.

In order to find a mate, Barred Owls will engage in courtships songs, which are different from their normal calls. Potential mates will often call in harmony or as a duet. Once a male woos his love interest and she accept him, the pair will mate for life. Breeding occurs between March and August, and females will lay a clutch of 2-4 eggs.

Barred Owls will prey on most small animals, like squirrels, mice, birds, rats, chipmunks, large insects, and reptiles, but how do they hunt in total darkness? The key to their success is their hearing. Apart from having excellent hearing, many owls, including Barred Owls have asymmetrical ear placement, meaning one ear is slightly offset from the other ear on their head. When the sound of a squeaking mouse reaches their head, the time it takes that sound to reach one ear versus the other will give the owl a precise location of the sound in a 3-dimensional space, and thus, the prey. This is known as sound localization. In fact, their hearing is so good and their sound localization is so refined that they are able to target a rodent digging under the snow with pinpoint accuracy.

White-Nosed Coati

White-Nosed Coati live in a variety of habitats from tropical lowlands to drier mountains forests in North, Central and South America. Females travel in groups, called bands, which can number anywhere from 4 to 40 individuals, while males 2 years and up travel alone.

Coati are omnivores with a diverse diet, consisting of insects, spiders, lizards and other small animals, as well as fruits, nuts, plants and carrion. They use their long snout to sniff out critters underground, and then use their sharp claws to dig them out.and up travel alone.

Coati mating season begins early in the year. During this time, solitary males will start to join female bands. These males will fend off rivals  and mate with several females. As mating  season ends, males are forced out of the band  and mated females will leave to have their  litters about 77 days later. Moms and pups  return to the band about 5-6 weeks after birth.

Unlike the other three species of coati, White-Nosed Coati populations are apparently stable, though lack of field data may drastically underestimate their numbers. Deforestation, habitat loss, and introduced predators, such as cats and boa constrictors, all pose threats to their continual health. The Eastern and Western Mountain Coati species are either endangered or threatened.

 

 

Coati

White-Nosed coatis live in a variety of habitats from tropical lowlands to drier mountain forests in North, Central and South America. Females travel in groups called bands, which can number anywhere from 4 to 40 individuals while males 2 years and up travel alone.

Coatis are omnivores with a diverse diet, consisting of insects, spiders, lizards and other small animals, as well as fruits, nuts, plants and carrion. They use their long snout to sniff out critters underground, and then use their sharp claws to dig them out.

Coati mating season begins early in the year. During this time, solitary males will start to join female bands. These males will fend off rivals and mate with serval females. As mating season ends, males are forced out of the band and mated females will leave about 77 days later. Moms and pups return to the band about 5-6 weeks after birth.

Unlike the other species of coati, White-Nosed Coati populations are apparently stable, through lack of field data may drastically underestimate their numbers. Deforestation, habitat loss and introduced predators, such as cats and boa constrictors, all pose threats to their continual health. The Eastern and Western Mountain Coati species are either endangered or threatened.

 

Get up close and personal with our coati brothers with our Coati Connection adventure!
Click HERE for more information!

 

 

Critter Corner

Critter Corner is home to a variety of different animals including our Albino Burmese Python, Red-Tail Boa and many more amazing critters.

Albino Burmese Python

Native to the jungles and grassy marshes of Southeast Asia, Burmese pythons are among the largest snakes on Earth. They are capable of reaching 23 feet or more in length and weighing up to 200 pounds with a girth as big as a telephone pole! When young, they will spend much of their time in the trees. However, as they mature and get bigger, they are mainly ground-dwelling. They are also excellent swimmers and can stay submerged for up to 30 minutes before surfacing for air.
Burmese pythons are carnivores, surviving primarily on small mammals and birds. They have poor eyesight, and stalk prey using chemical receptors in their tongues and heat-sensors along their jaws. Burmese Python kill by constricting, grasping a victim with their sharp teeth, coiling their bodies around the animal, and squeezing until it suffocates. They have stretchy ligaments in their jaws that allow them to swallow all their food whole.
Burmese pythons are popular pets in United States because of their attractive color pattern, reputed docility, and the allure of owning a giant snake. However, they grow large quickly and can reach 8 feet within their first year! Unable to handle their giant snakes and unable to find new homes for them, some owner illegally releases them into the wild. Released and escaped Burmese pythons are now breeding in the wild, and their growing numbers may result in dire consequence for native.
They are considered an invasive species, which means that they are not constrained by natural factors (such as predators) to keep their numbers in check. The release of Burmese pythons in South Florida is especially troublesome because the subtropical climate, the vast undisturbed habits of the Everglades and the plentiful prey enable the species to thrive at the expense of native and sometimes endangered species. Pythons’ rapid and widespread invasion is facilitated by their diverse habitat use, broad dietary preferences, long lifespan (15-25 years), high reproductive output, and ability to move long distances.

Red-Tail Boa

Red-tailed boa constrictors originate from tropical South and Central America, from Brazil and Columbia all the way north through Mexico. Female boas are larger than males and adults can grow up to 13 feet in length and can weight up to 13 feet in length and can weigh up to 50 pounds! They are mostly brown and gray with red coloring towards their tails, thus the name red-tailed boas. They live in woodlands, semi-arid forests and tropical rain forests. Although they love warm, humid weather, they are nocturnal snakes that spend the hot days lazing about under logs or cooling off in rivers. During cooler nights, they hunt for prey, including small mammals, rodents and lizards. Their jaws are lined with small, hooked teeth for grabbing and holding prey while they wrap their muscular bodies around their victim, squeezing until it suffocates.
Red-Tailed Boas are solitary reptiles, and although excellent swimmers, they prefer to spend their time in hollow logs and abandoned mammal burrows or, being partially arboreal snakes, hanging on low branches. They generally only spend time together during mating, which can take place at any point throughout the year. Females give birth to live babies and can have up to 60 two-foot long babies at a time!

 

Quill You Be My BFF?

Our Aquarium Family – Quill You Be My BFF?

Animal trainer Caroline didn’t expect to form such a close bond with a porcupine, but Alex the porcupine holds a special place in her heart. Follow along to learn more about these BFFs!

 

Bug Encounter

Have a personal and interactive encounter with some of our most interesting Bugs!

Our trained specialists will bring you and several of our favorite bugs to our education classroom for the opportunity to hold and learn more about bugs like the Large Devil’s Walking Sticks, Orchid Mantis, Leaf Insects, Giant Beetles and more! You won’t see this amazing collection of bugs from all over the world, anywhere else! And don’t be afraid! Our bugs are friendly and none can hurt you.

Times:
Daily at 1PM
Please visit our Information Center for more details.

• 30-minute encounter
• Minimum class size – 4 guests/max. 20 guests

Pricing:
$10*/pp (Members $9)
Ages 4 & Up
Reservations required.

Sea Lion Encounter

Learn all about the stars of our Sea Lion show!

Hug from a sea lion

 

• Talk with one of our animal caregivers and learn about these playful animals, why they are so important to us and how their species are doing in their natural environment.
• Help with set-up for the Sea Lion Show and learn how and why the team trains our animals.
• You’ll discuss positive reinforcement techniques as well as learn about the fish we feed our sea lions and how you can make sustainable seafood options for yourself.
• You’ll have a front row seat at a sea lion show!
• Participate in a training session after the sea lion show. You’ll practice behaviors with the show’s star sea lion, and even throw him or her a fish!
• Get a kiss from a Sea Lion!
• The experience will be captured by our photographer. Purchase the series of photos (details to come).

When working with animals, they call the shots. Each encounter is unique and may contain different elements.

Day/Times – The Sea Lion Encounter is currently Unavailable for the Season.  This adventure will become available in April.
Sundays / 10:15am
Session = 1.5hr (approx.)

Price
$125.00
(Aquarium Members: $112.50)*

 

 

 

>> Click to Download the Waiver<<

Pinniped Encounter Rules

  • SEAL ENCOUNTER: Guests must have the ability to go up and down steps and uneven surfaces. Unfortunately, guests in wheelchairs cannot be accommodated.
  • SEA LION ENCOUNTER: Guests in wheelchairs can be accommodated, please notify staff at the time of reservation.
  • To ensure the safety of our animals, personal cameras (including those in cell phones or other electronic devices) cannot be used during your animal program.
  • No refunds will be issued for cancellations made less than 24-hours prior to the reserved program. Payment is required at the time of booking.
  • No refunds will be issued for guests that do not meet the program requirements for age, physical fitness, or who violate company policies.
  • We go rain or shine! No refunds for bad weather unless Long Island Aquarium cancels the excursion.
  • Long Island Aquarium reserves the right, under certain circumstances, to omit specific behaviors or interactions from the program.
  • Long Island Aquarium reserves the right to refuse service to any guest under the influence of alcohol or any illegal drugs.
  • Participants must be able to understand basic instructions in English in order to safely participate.
  • Participants must not have contact with any wild marine mammal within 48 hours of participation to avoid disease transmission to our animals.
  • Participants should be willing to participate in the program and be comfortable with interacting with a live animal.
  • No flip flops, open back, open toe, or high heeled shoes. Sneakers are recommended. Please be advised that feet may get wet.
  • Follow directions at all times.
  • Do not enter animal areas until instructed.
  • No food or drink in animal areas.
  • No chewing gum.
  • No strollers will be permitted in the encounter
  • No sunglasses or other eyewear unless prescription for vision correction.
  • Watch footing. The beach may have an irregular surface and may be slippery.
  • Disinfect hands, as instructed, prior to the program.
  • Do not feed the sea lions until instructed.
  • Do not touch the animal until instructed.
  • Be very careful around the sea lions eyes, ears, and mouth.
  • No sudden movements or yelling.
  • Exit the program area when instructed to do so.

 

*Must be 10 years or older and reserved 24 hours in advance. All participants must complete waiver prior to adventure. Aquarium admission is not included and is required for the adventure!

Penguin Selfie

You know you love them, now have a souvenir photo taken with one of our African Penguins! Penguin Selfies is a great opportunity for those who are too young for our Penguin Encounter program, or if you just want a quick visit and photo with one of our favorite feathered friends. Makes a great holiday or milestone photo!

· Maximum of two guests per photo

· Children under 5 MUST be accompanied by an adult

· This is a “Hands Off” experience, you will not be permitted to touch the penguin

· No personal photos permitted

Pricing

$17 Emailed photo

Sea Lion Show

Long Island Aquarium’s Sea Lion Coliseum is the place to go to appreciate the grace, playfulness, and intelligence of the California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) in our Sea Lion Show.

Sea lions, which get their name from their loud roars, barks, and honks, put on a fascinating show whenever they are in the water! Just look through the underwater viewing windows of our Sea Lion Coliseum inside the aquarium to marvel at these graceful swimmers!

There’s an even better performance waiting for you outside! Long Island Aquarium’s expert mammal trainers put on a daily Sea Lion Show. It’s your opportunity to watch the Aquarium’s talented sea lions – Java, Bunker and Nila – demonstrate a variety of impressive behaviors!

Proudly Sponsored by:

BNB_Logo_Tag_4C

Turtle Bay

Torn apart by hurricane winds and typhoon surf, the docks at Turtle Bay are in disrepair. Yet, one person’s trash is another animal’s salvation! The docks are now overrun by turtles of shapes and sizes!

East African black mud turtles, red-eared sliders, and the alien-looking Australian snake-necked turtle are just a few species that you can see sunning themselves on the shattered docks. These ancient reptiles now call these waters home!

Long Island Aquarium’s Turtle residents are as hungry as they are friendly. For a small fee, you can purchase some turtle food to feed all of our turtles.

Shark Keeper

Our Shark Keeper Program is on hiatus from September through December – it is shark mating season and the sharks’ eating habits diminish during this time.

Get up close and very personal with the Aquarium’s largest exhibit and its biggest predators with the new Shark Keeper Program! Each participant will prepare to feed the sharks and other fishes in the 120,000-gallon Lost City of Atlantis Exhibit. Then, they’ll get the once-in-a-lifetime chance to pole feed our sand tiger sharks! Participants also experience a tour of other behind-the-scenes animal care work areas and take home a real-life shark tooth.

Program Includes:


  • Souvenir shark tooth from Lost City of Atlantis Exhibit


  • 
Greeting from Educator
  • Educational Program: Misconceptions about sharks, biology, pictures, shark tooth comparisons, animal overview, what to expect during the experience
  • Behind-the-scenes food prep
  • Brief overview of Safety and Policies

Keeper Schedule:

Mondays, Thursdays, and Saturdays. 
Session: 3:40pm
Length: 60 minutes

Please note: This program is on hiatus from September through December – it is shark mating season and the sharks eating habits diminish during this time.

Requirements:
All participants must be 16+. Each participant must complete a waiver.

Price:

$50.00, plus Admission (Members: $45.00). Space is currently limited to three participants per scheduled session.


Phone: 631.208.9200, ext. 426

>> Click to Download the Waiver (18+)<<

>> Click to Download the Waiver (For Minors Under 18)<<

Guests with Special Needs:

Long Island Aquarium  makes every effort to accommodate guests with special needs. Please be aware that to participate in this program, guests must be able to navigate the animal habitat spaces with minimal assistance, and must be able to understand and take direction in English from staff members. To ensure the best experience, please contact the Call Center at 631.208.9200, ext. 426 to discuss your individual needs and to reserve your encounter.

Cancellations:
There is a 72-hour cancellation policy. Any cancellations made within 72 hours will cannot receive a refund (credit will be issued). No-shows cannot receive a refund or rescheduled. Guests arriving late (after the required program check-in time) will not be permitted to participate in the program and will not be refunded or rescheduled. We encourage guests to arrive at the Aquarium with plenty of time to park, enter, and check into the program. Adventurers should report to the Main Entrance at least ten (10) minutes prior to their session. The sessions will begin promptly at the scheduled time. Please plan accordingly.

To change your reservation, please contact the Reservations Team at 631.208.9200, ext. 426.

Ray Bay

Want to know what a stingray or shark feels like? Ray Bay exhibit at Long Island Aquarium is the place to find out! You can touch southern stingrays (Dasyatis americana), cownose rays (Rhinoptera bonasus) and Atlantic stingrays (Dasyatis sabina)! For a small fee, you can even feed these large, beautiful animals. But hurry in to feed the rays soon as their food portioned out and there is a limit to how much they can eat each day!

Ray Bay is also home to white-spotted bamboo sharks (Chiloscyllium plagiosum), slender bottom-dwellers that live in the Pacific Ocean from Japan to Indonesia, and Thailand to India. Make sure to check out the sting rays as soon as you come in.

 

Proudly Sponsored by:

Peconic Bay Medical Center logo stacked