Lagoon

As you cross the wooden bridge over Long Island Aquarium’s Lagoon, look both ways to view a miniature panorama of Long Island – the towering bluffs and rock-strewn beaches of the North Shore on one side, and the rolling dunes and salt marshes of the South Shore on the other.

The fish represented in this exhibit reflect those that one might see off the shores of Long Island. All of the fish in this exhibit have been caught locally, typically in the Peconic Bay or Shinnecock Bay.

In addition to sand sharks, one of the most abundant sharks on the US Atlantic coast, the Lagoon features many fish common to Long Island waters, including striped bass, smooth dogfish sharks, weakfish, fluke, clearnose skates, tarpon, and many more!

 

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Poseidon’s Treasure Room

Poseidon’s Treasure Room houses several periodically changing freshwater and saltwater displays. It provides a fascinating view of unusual marine creatures and life, including:

  • Sharks and Egg Cases – Developing shark embryos in their egg cases let you witness the miracle of life as it unfolds.
  • Asian Hillstream Fishes – Many of these fish have special adaptations to help them not get swept away from swift currents.
  • African Lungfish (Protopterus annectens) – An air-breathing fish that could actually drown if no air were left at the top of its display tank.
  • Mexican Blind Cave Fish (Astyanax fasciatus mexicanus) – Fish whose eyes become covered as young fish mature.
  • Filter Feeding – A display that illustrates how spinges and other creatures sieve plankton by creating water currents.
  • Cerianthus anemone, tube anemone – Creatures that look like living lava lamps!
  • Lionfish (Pterois volitans) – Fish that have been carried to Long Island from the Carolinas by the Gulf Stream, and caught as part of a scientific capture program.
  • Frogfish – Short and stocky, these fish are often covered in bodily extensions to make them blend in with the ocean floor.
  • Tropical Lagoon – A display that illustrates how tropical lagoons provide protected nursing grounds for reef fishes.

Our Treasure Room gives us a way to focus on some of the smaller, more delicate fish that might get lost in our larger exhibits. 

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Lionfish

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Frogfish

Lost City of Atlantis Shark Exhibit

Poseidon’s 12-foot trident, pillars, and other remnants of the Lost City of Atlantis Exhibit create a ghostly environment for the inhabitants of the 120,000-gallon Lost City of Atlantis Shark Exhibit.

Menacing-looking sand tiger sharks (Carcharias taurus), bottom-dwelling nurse sharks (Ginglymostoma cirratum), and a gaping moray eel (Gymnothorax funebris) join a massive Queensland grouper (Epinephelus lanceolatus) and other fish in an exhibit that forms the centerpiece of the Long Island Aquarium.

Despite their fearsome appearance, the sharks in this exhibit, like most shark species, are not aggressive towards humans unless they are provoked. Learn this firsthand from within the shark tank! Make your reservations for a Shark Dive today and get a thrilling look at these beautiful animals from a sharks-eye view! After you dive amongst them, you can feed them by embarking on the Shark Keeper Adventure!

Shark at LI Aquarium & Exhibition Center